"Little things really belong to you," she said, folding the fan. "They don't have to be left behind. You can carry them in a shoebox."
"Carry them where to?"
"Why wherever you go. You might be gone a long time."
- Truman Capote, In Cold Blood


ROADSIDE MEMORIALS 


Life changes in the instant. The ordinary instant.
- Joan Didion, The Year of Magical Thinking
 
As private markers in public spaces, roadside memorials confront us with mortality in everyday contexts, functioning as anonymous tributes, expressions of love, and collective gathering spaces for negotiating grief and trauma. The maintenance of the memorials by the individuals and communities who build them speaks to the effort to create living memories. I’m interested in how objects facilitate a dialogue between the living and the dead in complicated ways. Many of my sculptures are fictional, while others are based on photographs that I've taken, layering homage upon homage.
 

BEDSIDE TABLES


Left​ ​to​ ​its​ ​own​ ​devices,​ ​vision...overlooks​ ​ninety​ ​percent​ ​of​ ​the​ ​world​ ​in​ ​order​ ​to​ ​follow​ ​the​ ​tracks laid​ ​down​ ​for​ ​vision​ ​by​ ​the​ ​world’s​ ​definition​ ​of​ ​spectacle,​ ​and​ ​by​ ​its​ ​own​ ​desires.​ ​[...]​ ​Still​ ​life loves​ ​the​ ​‘so​ ​what’. 
-​ ​Norman​ ​Bryson,​ ​​Looking​ ​at​ ​the​ ​Overlooked:​ ​Four​ ​Essays​ ​on​ ​Still​ ​Life​ ​Painting
 
Attention by itself is an enlarging glass.
- Gaston Bachelard, The Poetics of Space

Every passion borders on the chaotic, but the collector's passion borders on the chaos of memories.
- Walter Benjamin, Unpacking My Library
 
This series of miniature sculptures catalogues​ ​the​ ​objects on​ ​people’s​ ​bedside​ ​tables.​ ​I​ ​began​ ​by​ ​asking​ ​friends​ ​for​ ​pictures​ ​of​ ​their​ ​nightstands,​ ​and later​ ​expanded​ ​the​ ​series​ ​to​ ​include​ ​people across the country.​ ​I​ have been interested for a long time ​in​ ​how​ ​people’s​ ​collections​ ​of stuff create​ ​snapshot​ ​biographies,​ ​and​ ​I​ ​became especially fascinated​ ​by​ ​the​ ​wide​ ​array​ ​of​ ​objects​ ​kept​ ​on​ ​bedside​ ​tables,​ ​where​ ​tissues​ ​and​ ​chapstick jumble ​alongside​ ​sacred mementos. Items​ ​to​ ​screen​ ​out​ ​the​ ​world​ ​(earplugs,​ ​eye​ ​masks,​ ​​sleeping​ ​pills)​ ​are kept​ ​alongside​ ​those​ ​that​ ​invite​ ​the​ ​world​ ​in​ ​(​TV​ ​remotes,​ ​iPads,​ ​phones). 

These​ ​bedside​ ​collections​ ​speak​ ​to​ ​universal​ ​themes,​ ​from​ ​memory and​ ​self​ ​care​ ​to​ ​sex​ ​and​ ​dreams.​ ​But​ ​they​ ​also​ ​create​ ​complicated​ ​individual​ ​portraits​ ​of​ ​their owners,​ ​in​ ​contrast​ ​with​ ​the​ ​more​ ​idealized​ ​and​ ​narrowly​ ​curated​ ​collections​ ​one​ ​might​ ​find​ ​on​ ​a coffee​ ​table​ ​or​ ​other​ ​public​ ​space​ ​in​ ​a​ ​home. We​ ​spend​ ​about​ ​a​ ​third​ ​of​ ​our​ ​lives​ ​asleep:​ ​what​ ​are​ ​the​ ​last​ ​things​ ​we​ ​want​ ​to​ ​see​ ​or​ ​touch before​ ​drifting​ ​off,​ ​and​ ​what​ ​do​ ​we​ ​want​ ​watching​ ​over​ ​us​ ​or​ ​within​ ​arm’s​ ​reach​ ​when​ ​at​ ​our most​ ​physically​ ​vulnerable?​ ​

This work engages with the tradition of still life, cataloguing a daily world where routine meets consumer culture and personal history. The miniature also makes an appeal for close attention and slow scrutiny through a radical shift in scale. 

 
SPACE JUNK


Inactive satellites, the upper stages of launch vehicles, discarded bits left over from separation, and even frozen clouds of water and tiny flecks of paint all remain in orbit high above Earth's atmosphere. When one piece collides with another, even more debris is released. Over 21,000 pieces of space trash larger than 4 inches (10 centimeters) and half a million bits of junk between 1 cm and 10 cm are estimated to circle the planet. And the number is only predicted to go up. 
- Nola Taylor Redd, Space Junk: Tracking and Removing Orbital Debris

I saw two shooting stars last night, so I wished on them but they were only satellites, is it wrong to wish on space hardware...
- Billy Bragg, A New England

I am old. Everything is old. The planet is old. & there's no way to get rid of all this plastic. & we're shooting the shit into space. I used to want to go into space. For what? To see all this garbage floating by.
- Yuji Agematsu

There'd be time for that later; time to throw condensed-milk cans in the proud Martian canals; time for copies of the New York Times to blow and caper and rustle across the line gray Martian sea-bottoms; time for banana peels and picnic papers in the fluted, delicated ruins of the old Martian valley towns. Plenty of time for that. And he gave a small inward shiver at the thought.
- Ray Bradbury, The Martian Chronicles

It does not prevent me from having a terrible need of, shall I say the word - of religion - then I go outside in the night to paint the stars.
- Vincent van Gogh, letter to Theo

Lying on our backs, we look up at the night sky. This is where stories began...
​- John Berger, And Our Faces, My Heart, Brief as Photos

Constellations​ ​of​ ​cut,​ ​painted​ ​paper​ ​are​ ​installed​ ​directly​ ​into​ ​the​ ​wall​ ​with​ ​pins,​ referencing​ ​natural​ ​specimens and creating an architecture of shadows. Works in a recent series are composed of objects drawn from the mythology of specific constellations, celestial movement, and inventories of daily life. This work is informed by research into how space junk is rapidly accumulating in the earth's atmosphere, out of sight like garbage in landfills but not gone.